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November riches: silver and gold

November 7, 2010

A heavy frost has dusted the garden with silver, and weak November sun turns the yellowing leaves to gold. Here and there a late flower  – and a fearless robin – provides unexpected, jewel-like colour. A walk becomes a treasure hunt, except that the riches are everywhere about us.

 

See also: Closed season in the garden; Late summer in the garden

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11 Comments leave one →
  1. Margaret Lambert permalink
    November 8, 2010 1:01 am

    I am far from expert on birds, but your robin variety is quite different than ours- shorter and rounder. Most of our birds seem to have flown on to Mexico, to winter over in comfort. A few remain to fatten up on berries which are decorative, but not edible for us.
    The skeletal remains of some plants really are striking and I admire those that insist on blooming, despite the cold.

    • dancingbeastie permalink
      November 8, 2010 11:19 am

      Yes, I believe that North American robins are a fair bit bigger than ours. Also, the red flush on ‘British’ robins extends up their necks to their faces, so they are very cheery-looking little things. Ours are popular, especially on Christmas cards, because they have little fear of humans and they stay with us through the winter, when many other species head south.

  2. Margaret Lambert permalink
    November 8, 2010 9:32 pm

    Now that you mention it, I’ve seen ‘your’ robins on Christmas cards. Ours often feature cardinals, because they are such a brilliant red all over.

  3. Erika W. permalink
    November 8, 2010 10:07 pm

    Our American robins are in the thrush family–big and brazen. I feel they were named by a very homesick pilgrim.

  4. November 8, 2010 11:05 pm

    I *love* the crisp mornings! Thank you for sharing one of the joys of winter.

    • dancingbeastie permalink
      November 8, 2010 11:54 pm

      Me too! Melancholy can be lovely, but crisp mornings keep one sane.

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